“In art, man reveals himself and not his objects”, Rabindranath Tagore on art and artisans.

Art is the language of culture and the artist is the poet. The true intricacies and beauty of art can be seen in the hands of the artisans, who put their soul into making a single piece of work. All art forms around the world have their own story to tell. But unfortunately for some of them, the audience is unable to lend a listening ear. As a result, many of our traditional art forms are now on the verge of fading away. We, at Nazariya, are working to promote these dying art forms and to restore the artisans their pride and dignity, which they once enjoyed.

 

Wood carving artisan

Mr Laxman Bhatt- wood carving artist

” I am an artist and I am proud of it. I started at an early age, with the talent
inherited from my ancestors. With my slow and steady efforts, I honed my skills in
carving. The piece of wood and my passion to keep giving shape to my imagination
motivated me throughout.”

Lifestyles have changed so rapidly that our traditional crafts and art forms have been consigned to the archives, dying slowly with each new generation being brought up unaware about our cultural heritage. Lack of funding to globalisation, a lot can be attributed to the decline of art. As a result of this, the millennials are mostly unaware of the art forms that make up our rich cultural heritage. Even people who wish to know more about them, find it difficult to do so. All that they are left with are trips to museums and libraries, which provide only half the picture.

kinnera artisan

The Kinnera; a string instrument played by the Chenchu tribe and which is on the verge of dying. To read more about this click here.

One of the reasons why traditional art forms are dying is because the children of these artisans no longer want to carry on their ancestral art. The technicalities behind these arts are passed on to the younger generation and the knowledge is mostly confined to the same family or clan. Since machine-made art is cheaper and cost-effective, the age-old traditions have faced a backlash. Even though traditional art forms require huge commitment and dedication, these artisans seldom get enough recognition and financial support. This leads the youth to abandon traditional arts making it a major factor in their decline. Nazariya helps them by giving them a bigger platform and an engaging audience to work with. As soon as the market for traditional art forms improves, then money would automatically flow.

So, there is need to bridge the gap between the urban and the rural. While traditional art forms flourish in villages, they do not have an urban outreach. Consequently, Nazariya provides these artists with a platform to showcase their work and helps in building connections with the urban market. By being a part of Sargaalaya International Arts and Craft Festival- 2016, we have, thus, taken our mission to a new level. We are not simply a storefront for selling paintings and art & crafts, our aim is to build deeper interactions between the customer and the artisans. In addition, we also organise regular workshops, where visitors can have face-to-face interaction with the craftsman. After all, Mahatma Gandhi once said, “true art must be evidence of happiness, contentment and purity of its authors.” And to revive the art, we need to provide opportunities for the artist.

Given below is a list of some artisans and the art they specialise in.

ARTISANS

  • Mr Laxman Bhatt; Wood Carving
  • Mr Shankar Lal Bhopa; Phad and Miniature Painting
  • Mr Harekrishna Parida; Coir Toy Making
  • Ram Pal Singh; Braj ki Sanjhi
  • Mr. Chandan; Dhokra Metalsmith
  • Mr. Dilip Shyam; Gond Art
  • Mr. Abdul Rehman; Arabic Calligrapher
  • Kayakalp; Puppetry
  • Kreeda Games; Traditional Indian Games
  • Mr. Menon; Jambili Athon

In order to read more about various artisans and their work, click here.

 


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Image Source: www.anokhi.com/museum

The two-story pink sandstone haveli in the dusty lanes of Amber is usually easy to miss. Many of the locals know this as Chanwar Palkiwalaon ki Haveli and not Anokhi Museum of Hand Printing, eight miles outside Jaipur where women clad in the most colourful of sarees suspend their chat to wave at you.  The museum focuses on contemporary fabric ranging from innovative designs created by talented artisans to traditional outfits still worn in select regions today, albeit in dwindling numbers. A focused selection of historic textiles provides a context for a further understanding of block printing.

image source: http://josephinewilson.com/?p=417

Image Source: http://josephinewilson.com/?p=417

The one of its kind museum is an endeavour to preserve the community of artisans of 500-year-old block printing in Rajasthan. It was started by Anokhi, a clothing line selling block printed garments in stores across in India. The company was the brainchild of a British woman who married an Indian and moved to Jaipur in 1970, Faith Singh worked with local craftsmen to create contemporary prints on textiles that have become so popular in India and abroad. It was Ms Singh’s daughter-in- law Rachel Bracken-Singh who restored the dilapidated 17th- century mansion which once belonged to the palanquin bearers of the royals and turned it into a museum. This preservation project earned a UNESCO award for ‘Cultural Heritage Conservation’ in 2000. The old but well-maintained building is a cool relief from the desert heat.

 Large boards are put up in the open courtyard which explain the lengthy process of hand block printing. It all begins with the design to be printed on the textile. Once finalised—often floral, paisley or geometric—they are carved by hand onto wooden blocks which have been soaked in oil overnight and cleaned. These blocks are then used to print the pattern onto fabrics using natural vegetable dyes like indigo, pomegranate rind and turmeric in vibrant blues, reds and greens. 

 

 

 

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Image Source: www.google.com

 

 

Inside Anokhi

More than a hundred garments and blocks are on permanent display inside alcoves and galleries across two floors. There are ethnic designs and patterns  and also Western clothes in traditional prints, like knee-length dresses in shades of red and russet. On the roof-top terrace, a few craftsmen sit with their tools, ready to demonstrate their work to interested visitors. The museum also offers a 2-day course in block printing and wood carving to the enthusiasts. The museum shop carries a selection of hand-crafted merchandise which includes limited edition textiles, clothing, furnishings, jewellery, books and cards.

Anokhi is trying to preserve the dying craft which is overpowered by the more efficient and more economical machine-printing process damaging the livelihood of the artisans and threatening to extinguish an important craft. But it has a modern approach too. The team is always looking for new craftsmen and techniques to develop new garments in the main workshop on the outskirts of Jaipur. They have worked with a British designer to re-interpret William Morris’s prints, made costumes inspired by the Russian theatre, and worked their patterns into contemporary fashion—all of which are showcased in temporary exhibitions.

 

 

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Image Source: www.anokhi.com/museum

 

Visit them in Jaipur:
Chanwar Palkiwalon ki Haveli (Anokhi Haveli)
Kheri Gate, Amber, Jaipur
Tel:- 91 – 141 2530226 / 2531267

 

Museum Working Hours

  • Tuesday – Saturday : 10:30am – 5:00pm
  • Sunday : 11:00am – 4:30pm

Together with garments – Indian and Western in design – home textiles, sarongs and accessories, Anokhi offers a diverse and colourful selection of products in its 27 outlets in major cities of India. Anokhi doesn’t offer e-commerce.

Instagram @anokhijaipur

Facebook @AnokhiIndia

Here are some insights, with Ms. Rachel Bracken-Singh, the museum’s director:

Are there any festivals/events/Hand Printing workshops in the museum?

The museum offers regular works throughout the year. These are usually against request and range from individuals and small groups of enthusiasts to large school groups –from within India as well as visiting from abroad. School groups, college groups, design student groups – we tend to tweak the workshops to suit the particular need. While most workshops involve block printing we also offer block carving workshops. Throughout the day, the onsite printers and carvers demonstrate their skills and offer interactive sessions with visitors as they walk around.

 

What excites the visitors the most about your museum?

The response to the museum and what people enjoy most varies quite a bit. While most people love to try their own hand at block printing and also block carving, we find that there is a very clear appreciation for the overall quality of the experience from start to finish, in all the spaces at the museum. A great deal of attention has been given to clear and concise information and good visuals, and great care is taken in maintaining a high standard of care for the various striking and interesting textiles as well as tools, techniques, etc. The building is well worth a visit for that alone!! Visitors leave feeling that they have had a very positive, informative and satisfying and holistic experience.

 

How is the museum funded?

It is funded by Anokhi – we do not take outside financial support. The small shop there and museum publications go part way to supporting some of the costs.

 

What would you say to those looking forward to visit the museum?

Above all, I would recommend that any visitors coming to the museum should give as much time as they can to enjoy a complete experience – a full morning or an afternoon. The opportunity is there to fully absorb and appreciate one of India’s most beloved indigenous crafts,  set in a beautifully restored 16th century haveli. Interacting with the craftspeople and well-informed staff, and then enjoying a cup of desi chai in a traditional clay pot with a view of Amber’s enduring heritage is something to be savoured.

 

 

 

 


This article was originally created for, and published on www.gounesco.com, a UNESCO supported umbrella of initiatives that makes heritage fun.
By Meera Menon

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Tripunithura/Tripunitura, a land of temples, has its center marked with the Poornathrayeesa Temple with its history dating almost 10 decades back. This is supposed to be the only temple in South India where one gets to view the ‘Poornatrayeesa’ form of lord Vishnu.

Virschikotsavam is the grand eight-day long festival celebrated in this temple. It is set during the end of November, and this year it will be starting from 28/11, Monday onwards. The most striking part of this festival, or the highlight as we may put it, is the royal procession of 15 elephants, ‘The Ezhunnallippu,’ with the figurine of the deity held on top of the center elephant.
Yet another attraction is the “pancharimelam,” which is a traditional temple art form accompanying the procession, with instruments like Chenda, Kombu, Elathaalam etc.
Even though the procession is done every day, the fourth day, known as the triketta purapadu, is quite special. It was on this day, that we believe,  Vilwamangalam Swamiyar (considered to be a great saint in our history) made his visit. It is said that he found Lord Vishnu in the form of infant Krishna who was playing along with the elephants for the procession. On this day, offerings are made in a golden pot kept in front of the deity. This is believed to bring good luck to the people.
There is yet another story regarding the deity of Poornathayeesa here. It is said that the deity is afraid of firecrackers, which is why there are no ‘Vedi vazhipadu’ or crackers being used!


How can one define culture?

Culture defiantly speaks about a lot of possible horizons. Culture is infinite. Culture is a way of living.

The current generations is living an exemplar life. With the touch of 1900’s and the modernisation of 2000’s, this generation has been familiar with culture so far. But there exists a place where people are losing their touch with their roots, they are losing the significance of their background and emerging in the tech savvy, contemporary lifestyle where we might forget that all that we might be leaving behind is what comprises our history, our painting.

Anthropologically speaking, the concept of culture is an idea of single importance, for it provides a set of principles for explaining and understanding human behaviour. And the concept of cultural space is a boost for living a life which would correlate both our modern lifestyle and our culture altogether.

Therefore, a cultural space is a space or a community which has its own culture and since India is abundant with its variant cultures, cultural spaces are a very attractive idea here.

So far India has been enriched with few amazing cultural spaces which aim to uphold the culture for the people all over the world to experience and be a part of. These cultural spaces are a tourist attraction as well as a platform for people who practice certain culture which might be fading in the world but through cultural spaces, they aren’t fading anymore.

The most successful cultural spaces of India are the following:

LAMAKAAN, HYDERABAD

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Located in Banjara hills, Hyderabad, Lamakaan (meaning the abode of homeless)has become a contemporary addition to the city’s culture. Being a non-profit cultural centre which provides space for events such as arts, literature, theatre music and debates, Lamakaaan was Established in March 2010 by Ashhar Farhan, Humera Ahmed, Biju Mathew and Elahe Hiptoola. The day to day events are managed by Subbareddy Adapala.

Lamakaan hosts concerts of local artists like Warsi Brothers, Ateeq Hussain and many other. It conducts various book releases, plays, seminars and events like Wikipedia meetups. Lamakaan  has become an important part of Hyderabad for the artists but also as an open liberal space, where under the sun people can sit and talk and enhance all that’s around.

Lamakaan being such a positive space has been through rough closure threats but so far it overcame the threats and the establishment stands with the same aura. Lamakaan is a space that inspires.

About Lamakaan

Address Near GVK One, Road 5, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad.

Contact number +91 9642731329

Opening hours 10 am to 10 pm

Entry charges ticket for any events does not exceed Rs.100/

Web Address www.lamakaan.com 


SARAYA ECOSTAY, GOA

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Saraya is beautiful cultural space in Sangolda that is in the heart of Goa. Saraya is a Sanskrit word meaning “to begin, to flow.” It’s a space where creativity, art culture, food and eco living flows together in an explicit nature. It’s designed by Deeksha Thind, owner of Saraya and also serves as the chef and architect of the place.

Saraya is a confluence of artistic minds and energies. The main attraction is the 300 year old Portuguese house which holds itself as the art gallery where artists, sculptors, writers, musicians and theatre groups come to share their work and promote the local culture. Besides this Saraya also holds many workshops like workshop on Satori music and teaches various Prana movements. Also Saraya provides a stunning outdoor café with delicious meal and hostel facility which are so cheap that it makes this place a total steal away. Starting from Rs.500 to Rs.1500 depending on the rooms. Cherry on the top- They give you free Breakfast!

Ergo, Saraya is a must visit in Goa. It has an amazing energy.

About Saraya

Address House #64, Chogm Road, Sangolda, Bardez, Goa, 403511

Contact +91 8888926811, email- ria.saraya@gmail.com

Opening hours 5 pm to 11pm

Cost Rs.600 for two people approx.

Web address https://saraya.in 


 STUDIO SAFDAR, NEW DELHI

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A non-funded cultural space in the capital established in 2012 by Jana Natya  Manch (Janam)- one of India’s leading political street theatre groups. Taken care by Studio Safdar Trust, this is a place dedicated to creating an alternative and affordable space in Delhi for enactment and experimenting with art. Studio Safdar mainly supports activities which are involved with the exploration of multiple intersections of communities and politics.

Studio Safdar is platform which is perfect in order to discuss social issues and talk about the fading cultures and how they can be brought back in the society.

So far it’s new but it’s working on its pace. It’s a nice space for spending time watching drama all around and rehearsing. Studio Safdar is type of cultural space which is promoting theatre in an era where people are more inclined towards movies. Great effort by the trust is resulting in something  so good as Studio Safdar is a hope for all the theatre groups around Delhi and other places.

About Studio Safdar

Address 2254/2A Shadi Khampur, Guru Nanak Nagar, New Ranjeet Nagar, New Delhi-110008

Contact +91 9818386114| 011 2570 9456

Opening hours 11am to 8pm

Entry charges FREE

Web address   www.studiosafdar.com


SHILPARAMAM,HYDERABAD

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From Indian pottery to plethora of weaves, woodwork, jewellery, clothes and local crafts of each region of the country, Shilparamam is a fantasy of India’s colour, diversity and talent.  Established in 1992, Shilparamam is spread over 65 acres in Madhapur.

This cultural space is regarded as an never ending cycle of festivals of arts and crafts which presents ethnic art, crafts and skills of the rural folk from all parts of the country.

The most interesting part of Shilparamam is its rural museum. It’s the epitome of classic Indian village depicting rural and tribal lifestyles. It’s a window for the city dwellers and people around the world to see the rural lifestyle.

However, Shilparamam is Hyderabad’s tribute to India’s natural beauty and rich cultural heritage.

About Shilparamam

Address Hi Tech City Main Road, Madhapur, Near Cyber Towers, Hyderabad, Telangana 500081

Contact no +91 4064518164

Opening Hours 10:30 am to 8pm

Entry Charges For Adults INR 40 and for Children INR 20

Website www.shilparamam.in


CHOLAMANDAL ARTISTS VILLAGE

INJAMBAKKAM, CHENNAI

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10km south of the Adyar river is a bohemian artist village, spread over 10 acres is Cholamandal Artists Village- this artist village is a serene point to relax. Founded in 1966 by artists of the Madras Movement, Cholamandal is India’s largest self-supporting artist’s village and one of the most successful in Asia.

K.C.S. Paniker, painter and the visionary behind Cholamandal, gave India contemporary Indian art. Today it’s a major attraction, this beautiful village is amazingly equipped with everything which needs it to make a hub for contemporary art. Especially the open air theatre- Bharathi, which conducts many conferences, discussions and seminars.

Cholamandal Artist Village has earned massive respect and holds a great reputation all around the world. It believes in art only and is holding the responsibility of portraying contemporary art in the best way ever!

About Cholamandal Artist Village

Address E Coast Road, Cholamandal Artists Village, Injambakkam, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600115

Contact No 044 2449 0092

Opening Hours 9:30 am to 6:30 am

Entry charges Rs. 20 for Adults and Rs.5 for Children

Website www.cholamandalartistvillage.com


SMRITI NANDAN CULTURAL CENTRE, BANGALORE

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Smriti Nandan Cultural Centre is a perfect example of alliance between culture and modernity. The mainstream focus of this centre is directed towards preserving the traditions and cultures for the present as well as future generations. They’ve evolved traditions and new legends of music, art, design, theatre, craft and beauty for the people of Bangalore to experience the culture they’ve been leaving behind.

Every month Smriti Nandan conducts cultural programmes which are mainly about philosophy and spirituality, folk theatre, literary events, designing, Film making, music, craft, art, dance etc.

They move along with the modern energy and traditional motifs creating a splashing exposure to our heritage.

 

About Smriti Nandan Cultural Center

Address 15/3, Palace Rd, Vasanth Nagar, Bengaluru, Karnataka 560052

Contact No 080 2225 8091

Opening hours Monday to Friday: 9 am to 6 pm

Entry Charges Rs.150 (including one house drink)

Website www.smritinandan.org

The entire concept of having a cultural space is outstanding as our culture this way never really dies; it stays and stays until people associated with them uphold them. Cultural space not only brings responsibility for people to stay close to their roots but also brings them nostalgia with flashback to their history. The above discussed cultural spaces are so far making so much difference in India and its people as this concept is walking side by side with living the tradition and living the modern life.

As long as people loving their culture and roots exist, it might not fade but stay for numerous future generations to see what cultural extravaganza is India!


India is a nation which holds a cultural hub which is beyond comparison and it stands with its remarkable harmony and colours of different cultures and traditions. However, the history of India is one another topic which draws out attention and when it comes to preserving the history and exhibiting it, we Indians take pride in it like no other. There are numerous cultural museums in our country which attracts people from all over the world. Out of so many we present before you a few unique and exquisite cultural museums of India.

Bay Island Driftwood Museum – Kottayam

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A museum exhibiting an exclusive collection of superior quality driftwood articles of immensely high artistic value, prepared through a rare and innovative modern art form, is operating at the picturesque village of Kumarakon in Kottayam. Being the only driftwood museum in India, The Bay Island Driftwood Museum has been certified by The India Book of Records in 2013. Story goes that long ago a school teacher Raji Punnoose (curator and proprietor) picked up the habit of randomly collecting driftwood pieces brought by the sea to the shore. With each cyclone the sea brought along ancient trees and roots and left behind its loot on the shores. These pieces were gathered, cleaned and shaped to give them creative forms – birds, fish, and animals. This process of developing the plundered goods brought in by the Bay of Bengal is on display at this museum for us to see.

The Limca Book of Records has certified that Bay Island Museum as the only drift wood museum that showcases objects which have been painstakingly recovered  and collected from the Andaman seas and beaches by Raji Punnoose. The museum is today managed by a trust to ensure its perpetuity. Recognising its potential as a special interest tourist destination, the state government awarded it the ‘Most Innovative Tourism Project’ prize in 2004. Even though tourists many not exactly be making a beeline for the museum, the recent status of Kumarakom as an incubator for the state’s responsible tourism initiatives is good news. Since it opened its doors in 2001, tourists from close to 100 countries have visited the museum till date. The entry fee of Rs 50 is ploughed back into local area development as well as charity.

The government ruling that nobody can take into custody stuff brought in by the sea following the 2004 Tsunami means that the Bay Island Museum will remain one of a kind only. The museum is a perfect example of how a passion became an obsession and all those efforts given into this came out to be something which is unique and nothing in the world can match with it.

Address Chakranpadi, Vayitharamattom, Kumarakom, Kerala 686563

Contact 0481 252 6223

Opening Hours 10AM-5PM

Website http://www.bayislandmuseum.com/


Anokhi Museum of Hand Painting – Jaipur

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Critics called it ‘a little gem of a museum’; this interesting museum in a restored haveli documents the art of hand-block printing, from old traditions to contemporary design displaying a varied selection of block printed textiles alongside images, tools and related objects – all chosen to provide an in-depth look into the complexity of this ancient tradition.

Like crafts worldwide, the block printing industry faces serious challenges trying to keep pace with modern manufacturing. The Anokhi Museum of Hand Printing addresses this fragile situation primarily through education. Dedicated to the art of block printing, AMHP strives to inform both textile specialists and general public alike; but more importantly, the artisans themselves are encouraged to visit and view their craft in a unique and inspirational way. Whilst block Printing and Textile heaven these two are the epitome of grabbing attention of the visitors all around the world. Apart from interpreting, preserving and collecting the Rajasthani art of block painting, one can also observe a huge variety of textiles in the three storeyed museum, complete with elaborate explanations of the make, meaning, quality and speciality of the fabric and its print. One of the biggest attractions in the museum/art gallery is the on-site demonstration of block printing, which holds a high fascination factor for adults and children alike.  

Besides this the place also organises film programs in its auditorium, where documentaries about the rare art of block printing are showcased. If you feel inspired, you can also enrol for a 2 day workshop where you work alongside the skilled artisans on your own project, learning to make blocks and printed fabrics! For those who might be unaware, Anokhi is a brand with many stores across the globe, known for reviving the arts of our past. Also, the building in which this museum is currently was painfully restored by Anokhi’s founders in 1989, for which they were awarded the UNESCO prize for ‘Cultural Conservation’.

Ergo, Anokhi holds a massive fascination among people of age and background. It is a zealous initiative in order to protect the heritage of Rajasthan’s legacy.

Address  Anokhi Haveli, Near Badrinath Temple, Kheri Gate, Amber, Jaipur, Rajasthan 302028

Contact 0141 253 0226

Opening Hours 10:30AM-5PM

Website http://www.anokhi.com/museum/home.html


Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, New Delhi (IGNCA)

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A premier government-funded arts organization in India, IGNCA is an autonomous institution under the Union Ministry of Culture. It was established in the memory of Indira Gandhi, the late Indian Prime Minister. Launched on 19 November 1985 by the late Prime Minister Shri Rajiv Gandhi at a function where the symbolism of the components was clearly articulated at different levels. The elements – fire, water, earth, sky and vegetation – were brought together. Five rocks from five major rivers – Sindhu (Indus), GangaKaveri,Mahanadi and the Narmada (where the most ancient ammonite fossils are found) were composed into sculptural forms. These remain at the site as reminders of the antiquity of Indian culture and the sacredness of her rivers and rocks.

It’s a centre encompassing the study and experience of all the arts—each form with its own integrity, yet within a dimension of mutual interdependence, interrelated with nature, social structure and cosmology. The arts are here understood to comprise the fields of creative and critical literature, written and oral; the visual arts, ranging from architecture, sculpture, painting and graphics to general material culture, photography and film; the performing IGNCA; and all else in fairs, festivals and lifestyle that has an artistic dimension. In its initial stages the Centre will focus attention on India; it will later expand its horizons to other civilizations and cultures. Through diverse programmes of research, publication, training, creative activities and performance, the IGNCA seeks to place the arts within the context of the natural and human environment. The fundamental approach of the Centre is all its work will be both multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary.

Since, Art is an inevitable part of human nature, and perhaps the only activity that propagates free expression of thoughts in its purest form and IGNCA exclusively sets up for the preservation and promotion of art in the country.

Address   Mansingh Road, Opposite Of Raksha Bhawan, New Delhi, Delhi 110001

Contact 098148 85236

Opening Hours 8AM-6PM

Website http://ignca.nic.in/


Purani Haveli The Nizam’s Museum – Hyderabad

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Located in the Purani Haveli, Nizam’s Museum is a place worth visiting. Boasting of a rich collection of memoirs, gifts, souvenirs from all over the world, it was created on the wish of last and the seventh Nizam, Asaf Jah VII, the museum showcases a glimpse into the lives of Nizams, who have ruled the city from 19th to 20th century, commencing a high rate of development. Nizam Museum is entailed of a wide range of rare souvenirs and intricately designed mementos. The major attraction here is the golden, wooden throne, which was used during the silver jubilee celebrations of the Last Nizam. There is also a gold model of the pavilion. Diamond inlaid gold Tiffin-box, paintings of Mir Osman Ali Khan, wooden writing box covered with mother-of-pearl, daggers studded with diamond and gold, caskets, etc., are a few popular items on display. An exclusively designed silver perfume bottles, a gift from the Raja of Palvancha is also an admirable piece of art. For car lovers, there are vintage cars such as 1930 Rolls Royce, Packard and a Jaguar Mark V on display.

Another prominent feature is the wardrobe of sixth Nizam of Hyderabad, Mir Mahbub Ali Khan. The wardrobe, an entity in itself, is 176 feet long and has two levels. It is made up of Burma teak, one of the finest. The sixth Nizam, is said to have never repeated his clothes, which were given to other after being worn once by him. Hence a section for afore mentioned has been created and another section is of the wardrobe, costumes of other men, women and children of Hyderabad have been highlighted.

Thus, the Nizam’s museum is one extraordinary museum which takes us all the way to lifestyles of the Nizams. We have so far heard the stories of their luxury and sophistication but this museum engages us into imagining the life of the people who once used to live here and were accustomed to the life the museum so far displays. I bet it must be breath-taking.

Address Purani Haveli, Hyderabad, Telangana 500002

Contact 040 2452 1029

Opening Hours 10AM-5PM

Website http://www.hehnmh.com/

 


Therefore, these cultural museums out numerous others in India showcase the history and the unique culture and lifestyles of people who have lived and done so much in the and for the country. It’s a must to visit these museums and explore all that it has to offer us. The exposure of cultures and traditions of India that these museums gives us would definitely leave us spellbound and it would generate a new love and respect in our heart for our nation.

The mega diversity of India and its culture and traditions has drawn attraction from all over the world and will keep doing so. However the job of preserving and presenting the history of some extraordinary and exquisite culture of India has been done by copious museums in India. So far the blog talks about four unique and very interesting cultural museums of India which are for sure to leave you spell bound.


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